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Monumentum

Castor-vase of St Albans

The St Albans mithraic vase depicts fragments of three figures identified by Vermaseren as Hercules, Mercury and Mithras as an archer.
 
 
Mithraeum.eu
20 Aug 2021
 
  • Mithraic castor-vase of St Albans

    Mithraic castor-vase of St Albans
    St Albans Museum via Tertullian.org 

  • Mithraic castor-vase of St Albans

    Mithraic castor-vase of St Albans
    St Albans Museum via Tertullian.org 

 

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In the Verulamium Museum is a Castor-vase (H. 0.21) which was discovered in a public building (insula XVII) opposite the Theatre (cf. K. M. Richardson in Archaeologia, XC, 1944, 121).

On the vase with barbotine-decoration, three persons are represented:

1) The naked lower part of a man's body with a lion's-hide over his arm (Hercules).
2) The naked lower part of a man's body with winged feet (Mercurius).
3) Man walking to the right in Phrygian cap and with a bow in his r.h. Dressed in a short tunic, on which seven stars are visible at the bottom.
 
 

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